"

Of course, there is nothing inherently elitist about reason or the scientific method. Critical thinking involves applying a few simple rules that are accessible to everyone, at least in theory. And indeed, a lot of people become skeptics for the best of intentions: to spread the word of reason and critical thinking, to arm the masses rather than shoot them down. In highlighting bunk and deception wherever it occurs, their aim is to protect the vulnerable against the hucksters, charlatans, politicians and priests who exploit them.

But such is the character of skepticism that good intentions quickly get swamped by bad ones. Look past the crocodile tears on any online debunking forum, and you’ll quickly find that the majority of visitors are not drawn there by concern for the victims of irrationality, but by contempt. They’re there to laugh at idiots. I’m not going to plead innocence here: I’ve often joined in with the laughter, at least vicariously; laughing at idiots can be fun. But in the context of skeptic sites, the laughter takes on a bullying and unhealthy tone. It’s never pleasant to watch a group of university graduates ganging up to sneer at people denied their advantages in life, especially when for some of them it’s a full-time hobby. It’s an unfair fight between unequal resources, and far too few skeptics care about this inequality or want to do anything about it.

"

Why I Am No Longer A Skeptic (via afro-dominicano)

I can’t count the number of times I have had to argue with skeptics, my own peer group, that believing in the things we debunk isn’t stupid, it’s natural, and they would too in any number of other circumstances. It usually falls on deaf ears.

(via riotingfeminist)

"

I fold my doctor’s receipts into
bookmarks and tuck them between my
ribs but I still keep losing my place between
visits. When you asked why I stopped taking
my pills, I said because if anyone got close enough
to kiss me, they’d taste the residue against my
teeth and only stick around out of fear I’d take
eight more once they leave;

I left my diagnosis on the table at home before I
went out today because I’d been doing better, I’d
been feeling better, doc; but I want the next Hurricane
to be named after Hope because it can wreck all I’ve
come to terms with over years in a matter of minutes.
It’s a false sense of peace before the next wave. So, do
you think we could do that? Do you? If so, then I’d
like to ask for a scale to measure my tremors, too. If so,
I’d like to know when to tell the ones I love to take cover
and find shelter because all they’ve ever known of home in
me will turn to acres of empty land and darkness soon. Can
you label me a storm warning, doc? Please, can you?

You need to understand that I am rain, and a broken
compass, pain: dressed up with a heavy smile and aching
muscles from standing back up so many times.

I have reminders of this fight tattooed on my body
and even still, I keep slipping on things that overwhelm
me, until I stand again, and even still, I’m unsteady.
I just, I think I need better traction.

But doc, I don’t know if I’m ready. I
don’t know if I’m ready. I don’t know
where to go. I do know that this makes me
hard to be with. I do know that this turns my
name into a biohazard for upbeat environments;
So yesterday I tried swallowing your evaluation of me
so it would stop coming up in my conversations as an
excuse, but the ink stained your sentences onto my
tongue and now every time I speak it shows through.

I just desperately want all of this to stop showing through.

"
valentina thompson,
"I Wrote My Psychologist a Poem So She’d Stop Asking How I Was Feeling" (via theseoverusedwords)

(via riotingfeminist)

1109-83:


funkymonkey-boy:

 ”A product of U.S. Army-sanctioned mass slaughter of American bison in the 1800s, these bison skulls are waiting to be ground for fertilizer, most likely in the American midwest. The slaughter was so effective that the population of bison in the U.S. is estimated to have dropped from around 60 million in 1800 to as few as 750 in 1890.”
They were slaughtered as part of a U.S. Government Policy to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there.

"…to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there."

1109-83:

funkymonkey-boy:

 ”A product of U.S. Army-sanctioned mass slaughter of American bison in the 1800s, these bison skulls are waiting to be ground for fertilizer, most likely in the American midwest. The slaughter was so effective that the population of bison in the U.S. is estimated to have dropped from around 60 million in 1800 to as few as 750 in 1890.”

They were slaughtered as part of a U.S. Government Policy to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there.

"…to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there."

(Source: the-big-bamboo, via riotingfeminist)

mik-coolerthanyou said: Just imagine though if every wealthy black family adopted a white kid. I feel like people would be upset about that. Idk. Its just weird

brandx:

mik-coolerthanyou and reverseracism, you may be interested in this:

reverseracism:

People would be. Of course they would be, ‘what value can a black family teach a white kid’

- Susie

In 1904, a group of forty New York orphans were sent to live with Catholic families in Arizona. However, the Catholics turned out to be Mexicans and the local Anglos were so outraged at this race boundary transgression that they instigated a mass abduction of the children.

Through this direct action, trans-racial adoption as a white privilege was resolutely reinforced. This privilege continues in the contemporary era. One can only imagine the reactions if white European children were to be sent to African or Asian countries for international adoption.

In the pre-Civil Rights United States, a handful of states even went so far as to legislate against interracial adoption or even fostering of white children by non-whites, and in the late 1990s a widely publicized controversy erupted, when a black woman in Detroit wanted to adopt a white girl.

[…]The extremely few transracial adoptions of white children to non-white adopters that have taken place in contemporary USA not surprisingly also provoke hostile reactions and suspicions that the children might have been kidnapped and abducted, considering that historically there were laws banning and prohibiting people of colour to even foster white children[…]

Within Europe there is a long and similar tradition of stories[…] about Christian children who had been kidnapped and sacrificed for ritual murdering by Jews or Roma people. Such unfounded rumours often led to massacres, pogroms, and persecution.

Sources: 1 & 2 with commentary